Unmanned aircraft successfully tested as tool for measuring changes in polar ice sheets

Boldly going where larger, human-piloted planes cannot, they promise to close a key gap in knowledge for climate modelers.

Scientists studying the behavior of the world’s ice sheets – and the future implications of ice sheet behavior for global sea-level rise – may soon have a new airborne tool that will allow radar measurements that previously would have been prohibitively expensive or difficult to carry out with manned aircraft.

In a paper published in the March/ April edition of IEEE Geoscience and Remote Sensing Magazine, researchers at the Center for Remote Sensing of Ice Sheets (CReSIS) at the University of Kansas noted that they have successfully tested the use of a compact radar system integrated on a small, lightweight Unmanned Aircraft System (UAS) to look through the ice and map the topography underlying rapidly moving glaciers. … (Read more)

Source: EnvironmentalResearchWeb.org